70 organizations are joining forces for a job fair in Shelby County to tackle the shortage of construction workers

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As Kentucky’s construction worker shortage continues to worsen, nearly 70 different organizations in Shelby County came together this week to reverse the negative trend. On Tuesday and Wednesday, the Shelby County Fairgrounds hosted the 16th Annual Kentucky Construction Career Days Fair. “We had over 3,000 children that year,” said Wehr Construction’s Teena Oaken. “It’s the most we’ve ever had.” Oaken was one of the many vendors who helped plan the event and said it couldn’t have come at a better time. “Our future workforce is in dire need,” Oaken said of workers being lost at an alarming rate. The organization predicts that 2.2 million Americans will need to enter the construction industry by 2025 to keep the industry alive due to nationwide demand and population growth. “In Touch, our world will suffer,” Oaken said. Oaken said, although this is a jobs fair The goal wasn’t to hire anyone. She said it was just to give these high schoolers a seed, so they know they have options when they graduate have planes and corvettes and houses in the Bahamas.” Event organizers plan to host the event again next year.

As Kentucky’s construction worker shortage continues to worsen, nearly 70 different organizations in Shelby County came together this week to reverse the negative trend.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, the Shelby County Fairgrounds hosted the 16th Annual Kentucky Construction Career Days Fair.

“We had over 3,000 children that year,” said Wehr Construction’s Teena Oaken. “It’s the most we’ve ever had.”

Oaken was one of the many vendors who helped plan the event and said it couldn’t have come at a better time.

“Our future workforce is in need,” Oaken said.

According to the Homebuilders Association of Kentucky, the construction industry has been shedding workers at an alarming rate. The organization predicts that 2.2 million Americans will need to enter the construction industry by 2025 due to nationwide demand and population growth to keep the industry afloat.

“Well, by doing that [job fair] we’re reaching out to students from all over the world, because if these kids don’t speak up, our world will suffer,” Oaken said.

Oaken said that while this is a job fair, the goal isn’t to hire anyone. She said it was just to give those high schoolers a seed so they know they have options when they graduate.

“I have people in our association who started in high school,” said Lynn Faulkner, executive director of the Kentucky Association of Builders. “They own their own business now, they have planes and corvettes and houses in the Bahamas.”

The organizers plan to hold the event again next year.

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